From Side Hustle to Full Time: Cindy Weaver of Course Magic Designs 

 

In the enlightening podcast interview, Cindy Weaver divulged her journey through 23+ years of teaching, showcasing both her dedication to the field and the numerous obstacles she encountered. Her narrative underscores the reality of teachers grappling with both internal and external pressures, emphasizing the crucial role of self-preservation and boundary-setting in fostering a fulfilling teaching career. Cindy’s story exemplifies a teacher’s struggle with overwork and burnout, while her pursuit of intrinsic motivation and passion revitalized her dedication to education.

Cindy’s tale of transitioning and leaving the teaching profession marked a significant pivot in her life. The process, fueled by a desire for freedom and rest, spanned three years of exploration and preparation, both mentally and physically. Cindy’s interaction with a coach in Hawaii specializing in online course business consulting initiated her shift from a conventional teacher career to establishing her own online consulting business. The path was rife with emotional moments, marking her departure from over two decades in the teaching community.

In her newfound role, Cindy has transitioned into an alternative career option for teachers, serving as an online course consultant specializing in aiding life coaches and therapists. She has developed a variety of programs, including “Course Creation Express” and a mini-course named “The Pearl,” aimed at fostering clarity, showcasing the diverse job opportunities for former teachers.

This transition showcases Cindy’s resilience and adaptability, as she navigated through the realms of self-employment and marketing, underscoring the importance of teacher professional development and career guidance for teachers. Her venture, Course Magic Designs, signifies the realization of her desire for time freedom and aligning work with internal rhythms, exemplifying a successful teacher career transition.

Cindy’s journey highlights the career change for teachers is not only possible but can also be deeply rewarding. Her story serves as a beacon of career advice for teachers, demonstrating how teachers transitioning to industry can leverage their unique skills in the business world, particularly in creating educational resources that align with student needs. It’s a testament to what teachers can achieve when they get out of the classroom, illustrating that teachers are qualified for other jobs, such as ed tech jobs, and can find fulfillment in pursuing their passions.

Cindy’s venture into the online course creation realm illuminates the pathway for other educators contemplating leaving teaching for a new job. Her emphasis on self-discovery and pursuing one’s passions resonates as vital career counseling for teachers, offering a blueprint for those seeking to reformat a teacher resume and explore applying for non-teaching jobs.

In conclusion, Cindy Weaver’s narrative is a profound illustration of the possibilities that lie in teacher career transition. From grappling with the pressures of the teaching profession to exploring alternative career options for teachers, Cindy’s journey is a testament to the myriad of opportunities available for those willing to translate their teaching skills into the business world. Her story offers invaluable insights and guidance for teachers aiming to redefine their career paths, showcasing the potential for fulfillment and success outside the classroom.

 

Navigating Teacher Career Transition: Eric James Stephens’ Journey from Classroom to Corporate (Listen here!)

 

Amidst the upheaval of a global pandemic, many educators found themselves contemplating leaving the teaching profession. Eric James Stephens was amongst this cohort, facing displacement and grappling with the idea of a career change. The labyrinth of transitioning out of teaching might seem insurmountable, but for Eric, storytelling became the compass navigating him through these uncharted territories.

An Unwilling Departure & Teacher Career Transition Eric’s story begins at Central Washington University, teaching developmental writing. The impact of COVID-19 left him amongst those questioning their professional identities and considering alternative career options for teachers. “I panicked about losing my job, home, and identity,” Eric shares, a sentiment echoing the challenges faced by many in teacher career transition.

Harnessing Storytelling in Teacher Job Search Reassessing his position in education, Eric realized that the traditional teaching pathway was no longer viable, marking the beginning of his teacher job search. His approach to career guidance for teachers involved launching campaigns showcasing the multifaceted capabilities of educators, connecting with career coaches, and providing teacher career services through a series of workshops and interviews.

Building a Digital Presence & Personal Brand From a modest following to a digital presence marked by thousands, Eric’s journey illustrates how teachers transitioning to industry can leverage platforms like LinkedIn for career development. His focus on helping others and offering career advice for teachers facilitated his transition into data science and ed tech jobs. Eric’s narrative showcases how teacher skills can be translated into the business world, opening doors to job opportunities for former teachers.

Resume Writing for Teachers & Adaptability Eric’s shift also involved rewriting his teacher resume to suit a corporate environment. Learning SQL and Tableau, he highlighted the importance of adaptability and professional development in securing jobs that use an education degree. His experience underscores the value of adjusting a teacher resume for a corporate job and the importance of showcasing how teachers are qualified for other jobs.

Teacher Career Coach & Networking Eric’s path, guided by serendipity and decisive action, serves as career counseling for teachers looking to navigate teacher job fairs and explore what else teachers can do for work. His approach to networking and leveraging LinkedIn Learning demonstrates how a teacher career coach can assist in exploring alternative paths and translating teacher resumes for other jobs.

Innovation in Education & Teacher to Corporate Transition With a vision for improving education through AI, Eric exemplifies how teachers transitioning to industry can still impact education. His project symbolizes the convergence of teacher to corporate transitions and the pursuit of innovative ed tech jobs.

Conclusion: Crafting a New Narrative Eric’s journey from quitting teaching to embracing new job opportunities exemplifies how to get out of the classroom and reimagine one’s career. His story serves as a beacon of hope for those looking to leave teaching for a new job, offering a roadmap full of practical insights and inspiration.

Connect with Eric on LinkedIn for more insights on leaving teaching and transitioning into the corporate world. His wealth of content provides valuable resources for those rewriting their teacher resumes and exploring the vast landscape of what jobs hire former teachers.

 

Best Jobs for Transitioning Teachers

Are you experiencing teacher burnout? If I had a magic wand, I’d wave it over you and wish that you could understand just how versatile you are as a job candidate with the right kind of packaging. Teachers are highly skilled individuals who bring a wealth of knowledge, creativity, and leadership to the workforce. We are incredible communicators and have the kind of resourcefulness that amounts to success in workplaces beyond the classroom.

I think it’s hard to picture yourself in roles outside of the classroom when you don’t have a good sense of the types of jobs out there that are a great fit for transitioning teachers and when you’re dealing with teacher burnout. Let’s talk about what some of the best roles for teacher career changers are and what they entail.

  1. Web Developer/Software Engineer: These professionals design and build websites and software applications. They use programming languages such as HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to create dynamic and user-friendly interfaces.
  2. Scrum Master: A Scrum Master is a key player in Agile project management, helping teams to develop and deliver software in an efficient and effective manner.
  3. Project Manager: Project Managers are responsible for planning, executing, and closing projects. They work closely with team members, stakeholders, and clients to ensure that projects are completed on time, within budget, and to a high standard.
  4. Business Analyst: Business Analysts help organizations to understand and solve complex business problems. They gather data, analyze it, and recommend solutions to improve efficiency and profitability.
  5. UX/UI Designer: UX/UI Designers create user-centered digital experiences that are both aesthetically pleasing and functional. They work to make sure that websites, applications, and products are user-friendly and accessible to everyone.
  6. Recruiter: Recruiters help organizations to find the best talent for their open positions. They use a variety of sourcing methods, such as job fairs, online job boards, and social media, to attract candidates and build relationships with them.
  7. Instructional Coach: Instructional Coaches support teachers in their professional development and help them to effectively integrate technology into the classroom.
  8. Customer Success Manager: Customer Success Managers are responsible for ensuring that customers are satisfied with the products or services they receive. They work to build strong relationships with customers and help them to achieve their goals.
  9. Corporate Trainer: Corporate Trainers design and deliver training programs that help employees to improve their skills and knowledge. They use a variety of instructional methods, such as classroom-based training, online learning, and hands-on activities.
  10. Sales Representative: Sales Representatives are responsible for selling products or services to potential customers. They use a variety of techniques, such as cold calling, networking, and presentations, to build relationships with customers and close deals.
  11. Learning Designer: Learning Designers use a variety of instructional design techniques to create engaging and effective learning experiences. They work to ensure that learners are motivated and have the necessary skills to succeed.
  12. Program Manager: Program Managers are responsible for managing multiple projects and ensuring that they are completed on time and within budget. They work closely with project managers and stakeholders to ensure that everyone is working towards the same goal.
  13. Program Coordinator: Program Coordinators provide administrative support to program managers and help to keep programs running smoothly. They are responsible for scheduling meetings, tracking budgets, and communicating with stakeholders.
  14. Program Analyst: Program Analysts help organizations to evaluate the effectiveness of programs and make recommendations for improvement. They gather data, analyze it, and provide recommendations to program managers.
  15. Social Media Manager: Social Media Managers are responsible for managing an organization’s social media presence. They create and publish content, interact with followers, and measure the success of their efforts.
  16. Marketing Manager: Marketing Managers are responsible for creating and executing marketing campaigns that promote products or services. They use a variety of tactics, such as email marketing, advertising, and public relations, to reach potential customers.
  17. Data Analyst: Data Analysts help organizations to make informed decisions by collecting and analyzing large amounts of data. They use statistical methods to identify patterns, trends, and relationships in the data, and provide insights and recommendations to decision-makers.
  18. Copywriter: Copywriters create written content for a variety of media, including websites, advertisements, and brochures. They use persuasive language to engage readers and sell products or services.
  19. Content Writer: Content Writers create written content for websites, blogs, and social media. They use their writing skills to engage audiences and build relationships with them.
  20. Instructional Designer: Instructional Designers use a variety of instructional design techniques to create engaging and effective learning experiences. They work to ensure that learners are motivated and have the necessary skills to succeed.
  21. Instructional Coach: Instructional Coaches support teachers in their professional development and help them to effectively integrate technology into the classroom.
  22. Curriculum Developer: Curriculum Developers create educational programs and materials that meet the needs of learners. They use their knowledge of instructional design and current educational trends to create engaging and effective learning experiences.
  23. Nonprofit: Nonprofit organizations work to address social and environmental issues, and make a positive impact in communities. Teachers with a passion for making a difference can use their skills and knowledge to make a real difference in the world.
  24. Grant Writer: Grant Writers are responsible for writing and submitting proposals for funding from foundations, corporations, and government agencies. They use their writing skills to convince funders that their organization’s project is worthy of support.
  25. Administrative Assistant: Administrative Assistants provide administrative support to organizations and individuals. They are responsible for scheduling appointments, answering phones, and managing email.
  26. Machine Learning Engineer: Machine Learning Engineers develop algorithms that enable computers to learn and make predictions. They use their skills in programming and mathematics to create intelligent systems that can analyze large amounts of data and make accurate predictions.
  27. Data Visualization Specialist: Data Visualization Specialists use a variety of tools and techniques to help organizations make sense of large amounts of data. They create visual representations of data, such as graphs, charts, and maps, to help decision-makers understand the data and make informed decisions.
  28. Data Scientist: Data Scientists use their skills in programming, statistics, and mathematics to analyze large amounts of data and make predictions. They use their knowledge of machine learning and artificial intelligence to build predictive models that can be used to make decisions.
  29. Business Intelligence Professional: Business Intelligence Professionals use a variety of tools and techniques to help organizations make sense of large amounts of data. They use data visualization and analytics to provide insights and recommendations to decision-makers, and help organizations to make informed decisions.

I think, too, that you’ll want to keep in mind that your next career does not have to be your forever role. I’ve held several of the roles in this list myself! You can move around as different opportunities present themselves. So don’t be afraid to “make a mistake.” If you find yourself in a role or organization that isn’t a great fit, you’ll be able to move into something more suitable. And don’t forget that we’ve got downloadable, editable resumes for all of the careers listed here, pre-populated with teacher skills and experience. They are optimized for each industry with industry keywords taken from data scraped from LinkedIn and Indeed.

Best Jobs for Transitioning Teachers

Are you experiencing teacher burnout? If I had a magic wand, I’d wave it over you and wish that you could understand just how versatile you are as a job candidate with the right kind of packaging. Teachers are highly skilled individuals who bring a wealth of knowledge, creativity, and leadership to the workforce. We are incredible communicators and have the kind of resourcefulness that amounts to success in workplaces beyond the classroom.

I think it’s hard to picture yourself in roles outside of the classroom when you don’t have a good sense of the types of jobs out there that are a great fit for transitioning teachers and when you’re dealing with teacher burnout. Let’s talk about what some of the best roles for teacher career changers are and what they entail.

  1. Web Developer/Software Engineer: These professionals design and build websites and software applications. They use programming languages such as HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to create dynamic and user-friendly interfaces.
  2. Scrum Master: A Scrum Master is a key player in Agile project management, helping teams to develop and deliver software in an efficient and effective manner.
  3. Project Manager: Project Managers are responsible for planning, executing, and closing projects. They work closely with team members, stakeholders, and clients to ensure that projects are completed on time, within budget, and to a high standard.
  4. Business Analyst: Business Analysts help organizations to understand and solve complex business problems. They gather data, analyze it, and recommend solutions to improve efficiency and profitability.
  5. UX/UI Designer: UX/UI Designers create user-centered digital experiences that are both aesthetically pleasing and functional. They work to make sure that websites, applications, and products are user-friendly and accessible to everyone.
  6. Recruiter: Recruiters help organizations to find the best talent for their open positions. They use a variety of sourcing methods, such as job fairs, online job boards, and social media, to attract candidates and build relationships with them.
  7. Instructional Coach: Instructional Coaches support teachers in their professional development and help them to effectively integrate technology into the classroom.
  8. Customer Success Manager: Customer Success Managers are responsible for ensuring that customers are satisfied with the products or services they receive. They work to build strong relationships with customers and help them to achieve their goals.
  9. Corporate Trainer: Corporate Trainers design and deliver training programs that help employees to improve their skills and knowledge. They use a variety of instructional methods, such as classroom-based training, online learning, and hands-on activities.
  10. Sales Representative: Sales Representatives are responsible for selling products or services to potential customers. They use a variety of techniques, such as cold calling, networking, and presentations, to build relationships with customers and close deals.
  11. Learning Designer: Learning Designers use a variety of instructional design techniques to create engaging and effective learning experiences. They work to ensure that learners are motivated and have the necessary skills to succeed.
  12. Program Manager: Program Managers are responsible for managing multiple projects and ensuring that they are completed on time and within budget. They work closely with project managers and stakeholders to ensure that everyone is working towards the same goal.
  13. Program Coordinator: Program Coordinators provide administrative support to program managers and help to keep programs running smoothly. They are responsible for scheduling meetings, tracking budgets, and communicating with stakeholders.
  14. Program Analyst: Program Analysts help organizations to evaluate the effectiveness of programs and make recommendations for improvement. They gather data, analyze it, and provide recommendations to program managers.
  15. Social Media Manager: Social Media Managers are responsible for managing an organization’s social media presence. They create and publish content, interact with followers, and measure the success of their efforts.
  16. Marketing Manager: Marketing Managers are responsible for creating and executing marketing campaigns that promote products or services. They use a variety of tactics, such as email marketing, advertising, and public relations, to reach potential customers.
  17. Data Analyst: Data Analysts help organizations to make informed decisions by collecting and analyzing large amounts of data. They use statistical methods to identify patterns, trends, and relationships in the data, and provide insights and recommendations to decision-makers.
  18. Copywriter: Copywriters create written content for a variety of media, including websites, advertisements, and brochures. They use persuasive language to engage readers and sell products or services.
  19. Content Writer: Content Writers create written content for websites, blogs, and social media. They use their writing skills to engage audiences and build relationships with them.
  20. Instructional Designer: Instructional Designers use a variety of instructional design techniques to create engaging and effective learning experiences. They work to ensure that learners are motivated and have the necessary skills to succeed.
  21. Instructional Coach: Instructional Coaches support teachers in their professional development and help them to effectively integrate technology into the classroom.
  22. Curriculum Developer: Curriculum Developers create educational programs and materials that meet the needs of learners. They use their knowledge of instructional design and current educational trends to create engaging and effective learning experiences.
  23. Nonprofit: Nonprofit organizations work to address social and environmental issues, and make a positive impact in communities. Teachers with a passion for making a difference can use their skills and knowledge to make a real difference in the world.
  24. Grant Writer: Grant Writers are responsible for writing and submitting proposals for funding from foundations, corporations, and government agencies. They use their writing skills to convince funders that their organization’s project is worthy of support.
  25. Administrative Assistant: Administrative Assistants provide administrative support to organizations and individuals. They are responsible for scheduling appointments, answering phones, and managing email.
  26. Machine Learning Engineer: Machine Learning Engineers develop algorithms that enable computers to learn and make predictions. They use their skills in programming and mathematics to create intelligent systems that can analyze large amounts of data and make accurate predictions.
  27. Data Visualization Specialist: Data Visualization Specialists use a variety of tools and techniques to help organizations make sense of large amounts of data. They create visual representations of data, such as graphs, charts, and maps, to help decision-makers understand the data and make informed decisions.
  28. Data Scientist: Data Scientists use their skills in programming, statistics, and mathematics to analyze large amounts of data and make predictions. They use their knowledge of machine learning and artificial intelligence to build predictive models that can be used to make decisions.
  29. Business Intelligence Professional: Business Intelligence Professionals use a variety of tools and techniques to help organizations make sense of large amounts of data. They use data visualization and analytics to provide insights and recommendations to decision-makers, and help organizations to make informed decisions.

I think, too, that you’ll want to keep in mind that your next career does not have to be your forever role. I’ve held several of the roles in this list myself! You can move around as different opportunities present themselves. So don’t be afraid to “make a mistake.” If you find yourself in a role or organization that isn’t a great fit, you’ll be able to move into something more suitable. And don’t forget that we’ve got downloadable, editable resumes for all of the careers listed here, pre-populated with teacher skills and experience. They are optimized for each industry with industry keywords taken from data scraped from LinkedIn and Indeed.

Best Jobs for Transitioning Teachers

Are you experiencing teacher burnout? If I had a magic wand, I’d wave it over you and wish that you could understand just how versatile you are as a job candidate with the right kind of packaging. Teachers are highly skilled individuals who bring a wealth of knowledge, creativity, and leadership to the workforce. We are incredible communicators and have the kind of resourcefulness that amounts to success in workplaces beyond the classroom.

I think it’s hard to picture yourself in roles outside of the classroom when you don’t have a good sense of the types of jobs out there that are a great fit for transitioning teachers and when you’re dealing with teacher burnout. Let’s talk about what some of the best roles for teacher career changers are and what they entail.

  1. Web Developer/Software Engineer: These professionals design and build websites and software applications. They use programming languages such as HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to create dynamic and user-friendly interfaces.
  2. Scrum Master: A Scrum Master is a key player in Agile project management, helping teams to develop and deliver software in an efficient and effective manner.
  3. Project Manager: Project Managers are responsible for planning, executing, and closing projects. They work closely with team members, stakeholders, and clients to ensure that projects are completed on time, within budget, and to a high standard.
  4. Business Analyst: Business Analysts help organizations to understand and solve complex business problems. They gather data, analyze it, and recommend solutions to improve efficiency and profitability.
  5. UX/UI Designer: UX/UI Designers create user-centered digital experiences that are both aesthetically pleasing and functional. They work to make sure that websites, applications, and products are user-friendly and accessible to everyone.
  6. Recruiter: Recruiters help organizations to find the best talent for their open positions. They use a variety of sourcing methods, such as job fairs, online job boards, and social media, to attract candidates and build relationships with them.
  7. Instructional Coach: Instructional Coaches support teachers in their professional development and help them to effectively integrate technology into the classroom.
  8. Customer Success Manager: Customer Success Managers are responsible for ensuring that customers are satisfied with the products or services they receive. They work to build strong relationships with customers and help them to achieve their goals.
  9. Corporate Trainer: Corporate Trainers design and deliver training programs that help employees to improve their skills and knowledge. They use a variety of instructional methods, such as classroom-based training, online learning, and hands-on activities.
  10. Sales Representative: Sales Representatives are responsible for selling products or services to potential customers. They use a variety of techniques, such as cold calling, networking, and presentations, to build relationships with customers and close deals.
  11. Learning Designer: Learning Designers use a variety of instructional design techniques to create engaging and effective learning experiences. They work to ensure that learners are motivated and have the necessary skills to succeed.
  12. Program Manager: Program Managers are responsible for managing multiple projects and ensuring that they are completed on time and within budget. They work closely with project managers and stakeholders to ensure that everyone is working towards the same goal.
  13. Program Coordinator: Program Coordinators provide administrative support to program managers and help to keep programs running smoothly. They are responsible for scheduling meetings, tracking budgets, and communicating with stakeholders.
  14. Program Analyst: Program Analysts help organizations to evaluate the effectiveness of programs and make recommendations for improvement. They gather data, analyze it, and provide recommendations to program managers.
  15. Social Media Manager: Social Media Managers are responsible for managing an organization’s social media presence. They create and publish content, interact with followers, and measure the success of their efforts.
  16. Marketing Manager: Marketing Managers are responsible for creating and executing marketing campaigns that promote products or services. They use a variety of tactics, such as email marketing, advertising, and public relations, to reach potential customers.
  17. Data Analyst: Data Analysts help organizations to make informed decisions by collecting and analyzing large amounts of data. They use statistical methods to identify patterns, trends, and relationships in the data, and provide insights and recommendations to decision-makers.
  18. Copywriter: Copywriters create written content for a variety of media, including websites, advertisements, and brochures. They use persuasive language to engage readers and sell products or services.
  19. Content Writer: Content Writers create written content for websites, blogs, and social media. They use their writing skills to engage audiences and build relationships with them.
  20. Instructional Designer: Instructional Designers use a variety of instructional design techniques to create engaging and effective learning experiences. They work to ensure that learners are motivated and have the necessary skills to succeed.
  21. Instructional Coach: Instructional Coaches support teachers in their professional development and help them to effectively integrate technology into the classroom.
  22. Curriculum Developer: Curriculum Developers create educational programs and materials that meet the needs of learners. They use their knowledge of instructional design and current educational trends to create engaging and effective learning experiences.
  23. Nonprofit: Nonprofit organizations work to address social and environmental issues, and make a positive impact in communities. Teachers with a passion for making a difference can use their skills and knowledge to make a real difference in the world.
  24. Grant Writer: Grant Writers are responsible for writing and submitting proposals for funding from foundations, corporations, and government agencies. They use their writing skills to convince funders that their organization’s project is worthy of support.
  25. Administrative Assistant: Administrative Assistants provide administrative support to organizations and individuals. They are responsible for scheduling appointments, answering phones, and managing email.
  26. Machine Learning Engineer: Machine Learning Engineers develop algorithms that enable computers to learn and make predictions. They use their skills in programming and mathematics to create intelligent systems that can analyze large amounts of data and make accurate predictions.
  27. Data Visualization Specialist: Data Visualization Specialists use a variety of tools and techniques to help organizations make sense of large amounts of data. They create visual representations of data, such as graphs, charts, and maps, to help decision-makers understand the data and make informed decisions.
  28. Data Scientist: Data Scientists use their skills in programming, statistics, and mathematics to analyze large amounts of data and make predictions. They use their knowledge of machine learning and artificial intelligence to build predictive models that can be used to make decisions.
  29. Business Intelligence Professional: Business Intelligence Professionals use a variety of tools and techniques to help organizations make sense of large amounts of data. They use data visualization and analytics to provide insights and recommendations to decision-makers, and help organizations to make informed decisions.

I think, too, that you’ll want to keep in mind that your next career does not have to be your forever role. I’ve held several of the roles in this list myself! You can move around as different opportunities present themselves. So don’t be afraid to “make a mistake.” If you find yourself in a role or organization that isn’t a great fit, you’ll be able to move into something more suitable. And don’t forget that we’ve got downloadable, editable resumes for all of the careers listed here, pre-populated with teacher skills and experience. They are optimized for each industry with industry keywords taken from data scraped from LinkedIn and Indeed.